Significant Songs (123)

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Joy And Pain

Sometime late in 1980, I heard a song on late night radio. As often used to happen, I was grabbed by the sound immediately, and set off to find out about the band performing it the next day. Luckily, I had heard the name Frankie Beverly, and my trusty record shop man was able to find me the album (vinyl) that it came from. The group was called ‘Maze’, and Frankie was the lead singer. I bought it, and soon became addicted to the soulful sounds and mellow vocals, as well as the funkier tracks.

More research led me to discover that there were two previous releases, and I ordered those soon after. Within weeks, I was listening to little else, and began an appreciation of the sound of Maze that lasted for more than ten years.

They started out as Raw Soul, and were soon noticed…

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Significant Songs (122)

Love this song too!

beetleypete

I’ll Be Seeing You

I’m a sucker for certain sentimental songs. If I hear ‘We’ll Gather Lilacs’, I can feel a tightness in my chest. Play me Al Bowlly singing ‘The Very Thought Of You’, and you will see me drift off into a reverie. As I get older, I get worse, as I can now factor in nostalgia too.

When I was very young, the camp American pianist and flamboyant entertainer, Liberace, presented a successful television show. It was one of my Mum’s favourite shows on TV, and we watched it every week. He had adopted this song as his theme tune, so it soon became associated with him. My parents told me that it had been popular during the war, with its connotations about departures, returns, loyalty, and loss. They told me about the film of the same name starring Ginger Rogers, with the song sung by Bing…

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The British Film Institute: BFI Player

beetleypete

Film and documentary fans out there may not be aware of it, but the British Film Institute has a fantastic free resource available. Their BFI film player is free to download, and contains a wealth of free to view films and documentaries, easily streamed to your PC or any compatible device.

They also have a vast catalogue of pay-to-view films, which can be watched for a reasonable fee over a set time period. These include many World Cinema offerings, as well as up to date cinema releases. Their archive is second to none, and the documentaries range from the earliest days of film, through to family-shot cine films covering most decades.

I have no connection with this organisation, but cannot recommend this highly enough. All you have to do is create an account, download the BFI player, and choose what to watch. No card details are required, as they can…

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